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    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    We work to build a shared community of Black educators who are invested in providing students with a curriculum that is both challenging and empowering. Through critical thinking and a social justice lens we will forever recognize, emphasize, and humanize Blackness.

    This 6-week course is offered to teacher, parents and guardians to raise awareness about difference, equity and racial justice. In this course, we will reflect on how we learned about race and racism as children ourselves and consider how this plays a role in how we talk about race with our children.  We will also discuss how children think about and understand race and racism and consider how they make sense of the world around them.  And, finally, we will think about how institutions (such as schools) are organized to perpetuate racism and consider how we might interrupt this institutional racism.



    The Master’s Thesis/Field Project is the final activity of the Master of Arts in International & Multicultural Education (IME) degree. This course involves the research and writing of a thesis or field project on an approved topic which is submitted as a formal report in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s degree. Class meetings will take the form of an introductory session, SWAG meetings where we will have Critical Friends Support, direct instruction (IRB, methods, descriptive statistics), write-on-sites, individual consultations with the instructor and a final presentation. I will also send weekly check-in emails so that we maintain contact and I can track your progress towards completing the field project or thesis during the semester. As well, in your SWAG, you will use the external accountability check-in spreadsheet.  I encourage you to make use of the USF Writing Center Services, use the writing center run by Dr. Katz (see end of syllabus) or find a writing tutor to help provide support in the research and writing process. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the theory and skills involved in conducting research, including the following: statement of the research problem, identifying an appropriate theoretical framework, review of the literature, and discussion of implications. This knowledge will be evident in the written and oral presentation of the field project or thesis.  

    Public Scholarship and Community-Engaged Learning refers to faculty scholarly work (teaching, research, and service) that involves the faculty member in a reciprocal partnership with the community, including any individuals or organizations outside the academy, for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and authenticity.  Engaged scholarship asks universities to reframe their purpose and mission to one where engagement with community affords the application of knowledge of the university to evolving economic, social, and community needs, particularly those of the local and state communities in which the university is situated.  The purpose of this course is to prepare doctoral students with a deep understanding of the theory and practice of community-engaged scholarship before entering into fieldwork with a local school or organization.

    This course will examine the history of feminist and Afrofuturistic thought with a focus on intersectional and radical approaches. In particular, it will imagine a different social world and realities, for example, a utopian world in which a colonial narrative is not the basis for human existence or a world in which a carceral state that promotes the prison industrial complex is central.  We will look at Afrofuturism, specifically works by feminist writers who address this theme. It will reposition marginalized social locations (i.e., race, class, gender, ethnicity, and nationality) in relation to dominant Afrofuturist feminist theoretical frameworks, including critical race, postcolonial, queer, and transnational perspectives. It also will make connections between theory and practice in contemporary social movements. It will also examine cultural productions, including literature and film. You will learn that critical reflection is essential to social critique. You will engage in open discussion about social, political, cultural, and historical issues addressed in the works we will read. In addition, you will write analytical essays in which you interpret ideas and practices of social identity.  Students can elect to register for this course as Sociology, Africana Studies or Women's Studies 188.

    These resources and readings are available for facilitation training.

    As Vassar College continues to work toward establishing a community that can sustain challenging dialogues, we seek to find ways to support the pursuit of this college-wide goal.  This course offers opportunities for training in introductory dialogue skills and for students to consider how to use those skills in the very real spaces of their living communities.

    In response to tensions that arise annually in residential spaces related to both difficulty navigating conversations related to social identity and seemingly “less important” (yet almost always significant) disagreements/conflicts related to co-habitating or sharing common space, this course provides students with a framework, experiences, skills and practice that will support their efforts to live in communities in inclusive and intentional ways.  

    It is our goal to help students learn how to create a culture in their residential communities where people are more effective about communicating in ways that allow for growth.  Enrolled students should express an interest in learning techniques, gaining tools and increasing skills to learn to communicate across differences (differences in living styles and habits, differences in social identity, and differences in personal identity) effectively.  Students will, we hope, take those skills back to their living spaces to use in important ways.